Faculty
Faculty
Maya Vase Photography copyright Justin Kerr File #K1183

Omar G. Encarnación

Professor of Political Studies

Omar G. Encarnación
Phone: 845-758-7230
E-mail: encarna@bard.edu
Office: Aspinwall 209

Professor Encarnación teaches comparative politics with a focus on Iberian and Latin American countries.  He is the author of Democratization without Justice: The Politics of Forgetting in Spain (forthcoming from the University of Pennsylvania Press), which examines the politics of the repression of the memory of the Spanish Civil War and the Franco dictatorship during the Spanish democratic transition.  He is also the author of two other books, Spanish Politics: Democracy after Dictatorship (2008), an overview of contemporary Spanish politics, and The Myth of Civil Society (2003), a study of the role of civic associations and social movements in the politics of democratic consolidation in Spain and Brazil.  Published work also includes articles on democratization in Spain, Portugal, and Latin America, U.S.–Latin American relations, and U.S. foreign policy in leading political science journals, such as Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Politics, Political Science Quarterly, West European Politics, Human Rights Quarterly, Ethics & International Affairs, International Studies Quarterly, and Journal of Democracy, and contributions to policy journals such as Current History, Foreign Affairs, and World Policy Journal.

Professor Encarnación holds a Ph.D. in politics from Princeton University, where he held the Presidential Fellowship.  He is also the recipient of fellowships and research grants from the Fulbright Program, the Council for European Studies, the Ford Foundation, the National Research Council, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Program for Cooperation between U.S. Universities and the Spanish Ministry of Culture.  He has held visiting research appointments at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences of the Juan March Institute in Madrid, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington DC, and the departments of political science of Georgetown University, Yale University, and New York University.  In 2009-10 he served as Program Chair for the Comparative Democratization Section of the American Political Science Association.