Events
Events
Maya Vase Photography copyright Justin Kerr File #K1183

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Past Events

                  

2013

Wednesday, October 30, 2013
The Cuban Argument with Itself
Presented by Jorge Ignacio Cortiñas
Fisher Center, Resnick Theater Studio  6:30 pm
Reviewing the history of censorship and political intolerance in Miami and Havana suggests that these two centers of Cuban politics might be engaged in processes of polarization that often operate in concert with each other and have proved integral to the maintenance of the United States trade embargo against Cuba. As one antidote to this long standing polarization, Jorge Ignacio Cortiñas will review the efforts of Cuban and Cuban American theater artists who have for decades been organizing to subvert the embargo, noting the successful ways these artists have begun to normalize exchange and travel between the United States and Cuba.

Sponsored by: Bard Theater and Performance Program
Contact: Robert Bangiola  845-758-7957  rbangiola@bard.edu
  Tuesday, October 29, 2013
Margaret Gray: Labor and the Locavore: The Making of a Comprehensive Food Ethic
Olin, Room 102  7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Associate Professor of Political Science at Adelphi University, Margaret Gray will discuss her new book about migrant labor in the Hudson Valley, Labor and the Locavore: The Making of a Comprehensive Food Ethic.

In the blizzard of attention around the virtues of local food production, food writers and activists place environmental protection, animal welfare, and saving small farms at the forefront of their attention. Yet amid this turn to wholesome and responsible food choices, the lives and working conditions of farmworkers are often an afterthought.

Labor and the Locavore focuses on one of the most vibrant local food economies in the country, the Hudson Valley that supplies New York restaurants and farmers markets. Based on more than a decade’s in-depth interviews with workers, farmers, and others, Gray’s examination clearly shows how the currency of agrarian values serves to mask the labor concerns of an already hidden workforce.

She also explores the historical roots of farmworkers’ predicaments and examines the ethnic shift from Black to Latino workers. With an analysis that can be applied to local food concerns around the country, this book challenges the reader to consider how the mentality of the alternative food movements implies a comprehensive food ethic that addresses workers’ concerns.

Sponsored by: Difference and Media Project; Human Rights Program; Human Rights Project; LAIS Program; Spanish Studies
Contact: Human Rights Project  845-758-7650  hrp@bard.edu
  Thursday, October 3, 2013
James Clarke Chace Memorial Speaker Series
The Terrorist-Criminal Nexus: An Alliance of International Drug Cartels, Organized Crime & Terror Groups
BGIA, 36 West 44th Street, #1011; New York, NY 10036  6:15 pm – 7:45 pm
 Vanessa Neumann

Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Terrorism, Foreign Policy Research Institute; Associate, University Seminar on Latin America at SIPA (Columbia University); regular contributor, Weekly Standard

Sponsored by: BGIA; Center for Civic Engagement
Contact: Jonathan Cristol  646-839-9262  cristol@bard.edu
Wednesday, October 2, 2013
A Conversation with Juan González
Author of Harvest of Empire: The Untold Story of Latinos in America
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:30 pm
We are all Americans of the New World, and our most dangerous enemies are not each other, but the great wall of ignorance between us.
--Juan González, Harvest of Empire 
Sponsored by: Difference and Media Project; Human Rights Project; LAIS Program; La Voz, LASO, and ISO; Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  bail@bard.edu
  Wednesday, May 15, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Wednesday, May 8, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
Wednesday, May 1, 2013
José Esteban Muñoz
Feeling Brown: The Performativity of María Irene Fornés and Tania Bruguera

Fisher Center, Resnick Theater Studio  6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
José Esteban Muñoz is a Professor in the Department of Performance Studies at NYU. He is author of the seminal works Disidentifications and Cruising Utopia and co-editor of Pop Out and Everynight Life.

Sponsored by: Bard Theater and Performance Program; LAIS Program
Contact: Jorge Ignacio Cortiñas  845-758-7957  jcortina@bard.edu
  Wednesday, May 1, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Wednesday, April 24, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Wednesday, April 17, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Wednesday, April 10, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Wednesday, March 20, 2013
Spanish Film Screening
Span/Film 234. Buñuel, Saura, Almodóvar: Spanish Auteurs
Preston  7:00 pm
All films will be screened in Preston Theater (110) on Wednesdays at 7pm, unless noted otherwise. 
Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: David Rodríguez-Solás  845-758-7231  dsolas@bard.edu
  Wednesday, March 13, 2013
Spanish Film Screening
Span/Film 234. Buñuel, Saura, Almodóvar: Spanish Auteurs
Preston  7:00 pm
All films will be screened in Preston Theater (110) on Wednesdays at 7pm, unless noted otherwise. 
Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: David Rodríguez-Solás  845-758-7231  dsolas@bard.edu
  Wednesday, March 13, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
Thursday, March 7, 2013
Massacre, Mardi Gras, and Torture in Early New Orleans
Olin 205  4:30 pm
Sophie White
University of Notre DameThe earliest known eye-witness account of Mardi Gras in New Orleans depicted a masquerade that took place in 1730. But this description of hedonism and cross-gender disguises was an unexpected twist in a larger narrative. For this episode was immediately preceded by the 1729 uprising in which the Natchez Indians attacked French settlers, stripping, killing, and torturing survivors. And it was followed by the ritual torture and killing in New Orleans of a stripped Natchez woman captive. Most galling for the author of the account was the fact that French survivors had imitated, and even outdone, Indians’ torture methods. This transgression magnified anxieties about the potential for colonists to become indianized as a result of their presence in America. But in interweaving misrule descriptions of stripped, dressed, and disguised bodies, the author signaled that dress could channel Frenchmen’s metamorphosis into Indians, but also reverse such transformations. The key to this conceit lies in interpreting the placement of a topsy-turvy Mardi Gras masquerade in the very middle of massacre, torture and cannibalism.Sophie White is assistant professor of American Studies and concurrent assistant professor of Africana Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Her book, Wild Frenchmen & Frenchified Indians: Race and Material Culture in Colonial Louisiana, was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2012. Her articles have appeared in journals such as The William and Mary Quarterly, the Journal of Early American History, Winterthur Portfolio, and Gender and History. She was a fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities in 2010–11.
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; Art History Program; Division of Social Studies; French Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; LAIS Program
Contact: Christian Crouch  845-758-6874  crouch@bard.edu
  Wednesday, March 6, 2013
Spanish Film Screening
Span/Film 234. Buñuel, Saura, Almodóvar: Spanish Auteurs
Preston  7:00 pm
All films will be screened in Preston Theater (110) on Wednesdays at 7pm, unless noted otherwise. 
Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: David Rodríguez-Solás  845-758-7231  dsolas@bard.edu
  Wednesday, March 6, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Spanish Film Screening
Span/Film 234. Buñuel, Saura, Almodóvar: Spanish Auteurs
Preston  7:00 pm
All films will be screened in Preston Theater (110) on Wednesdays at 7pm, unless noted otherwise. 
Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: David Rodríguez-Solás  845-758-7231  dsolas@bard.edu
  Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Wednesday, February 20, 2013
Spanish Film Screening
Span/Film 234. Buñuel, Saura, Almodóvar: Spanish Auteurs
Preston  7:00 pm
All films will be screened in Preston Theater (110) on Wednesdays at 7pm, unless noted otherwise. 
Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: David Rodríguez-Solás  845-758-7231  dsolas@bard.edu
  Wednesday, February 20, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Wednesday, February 13, 2013
Spanish Film Screening
Span/Film 234. Buñuel, Saura, Almodóvar: Spanish Auteurs
Preston  7:00 pm
All films will be screened in Preston Theater (110) on Wednesdays at 7pm, unless noted otherwise. 
Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: David Rodríguez-Solás  845-758-7231  dsolas@bard.edu
  Wednesday, February 13, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Thursday, February 7, 2013
Candidate for the Position in Spanish
Patricia Lopez-Gay
Olin 205  5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Rewriting the Lives of Spain’s “Stolen Children”: The Biographical Impulse and Social Media

Only in the past few years has it become widely known that one of the largest networks of child trafficking in contemporary Europe was created in Francoist Spain and remained operative until the late 90s. This talk will analyze the biographical and autobiographical narratives that take shape in Facebook groups created by the victims, archival spaces where individuals share information and seek to complete and rewrite their life stories. The new technology changes not simply the archiving process, but what is archivable in a narrative form. Through the formation of collective digital archives, families and individuals become their own archivists--they create and add content in many different forms and media, such as written official documents, oral testimony, familial and personal records, photographs, and audiovisual recordings. Is there a distinctive cultural role for such web-based archives in witnessing history and memorializing our lives, both individually and collectively, in contemporary Spain?

Autobiographical narratives are generally constructed upon the impression of an individual’s past life experiences in the present time: what “might” or “will have been”. As part of a permanently updatable intertext of narratives, the life stories of the stolen children are also marked by the shared loss of what “could have been (and will never be)”. From such absence there arises a collective desire to rewrite the lives of entire generations of people. Could we maybe speak of a collective “biographical impulse” that would surpass and frame the autobiographical in the collective archives created for, and by, the “stolen children”?


Sponsored by: Dean of the College
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Wednesday, February 6, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
Tuesday, February 5, 2013
Candidate for the Position in Spanish
Òscar O. Santos-Sopena
Olin 205  5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Literary Dreamers: A Visual Journey from Bernat Metge to Francisco de Quevedo

My research study analyzes the work of several Catalan and Castilian authors, who use the motif of the dream as a specific humanist perspective, a literary genre, and a philosophical classical discourse. Thus, this presentation explores the intersection of culture, religion, and literary theory in the work of two Iberian Peninsular authors: Lo somni (1399) by the Catalan writer Bernat Metge (1350-1413) and Los sueños (1627) by the Castilian Francisco de Quevedo y Villegas (1580-1645). Both works represent excellent examples of the use of dreams as a cultural and historical narrative of two epochs: Catalan Humanism and Castilian-Spanish Baroque. I suggest that both texts should be explored in relation to the notion of Christian Humanism, where the use of the dream emerges as a literary genre and artistic philosophical device. I argue that this cross-pollination of humanisms from the Mediterranean world served as a bridge between the different civilizations and cultures. Moreover, as my multidisciplinary research indicates, I include exhaustive visual representations of dreams from the Medieval to Contemporary periods. Through this visual journey, I demonstrate that the introduction of dreams in these narratives is instrumental in separating reality and fiction.

Sponsored by: Dean of the College
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Monday, February 4, 2013
Candidate for the Position in Spanish
Francisca Gonzales-Flores
Olin 202  5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Spain and America in Antonio Machado's Early Prose

Traditionally, the work of Spanish poet Antonio Machado (Sevilla, 1875 – Collioure, 1939) has been seen as an evolutionary process, from his more introspective first texts to his socially and politically engaged later works. However, Machado’s social and political concerns can already be found in his very first publications, that is, in the articles that appeared in the newspaper “La Caricatura” (“The Caricature”) in 1893. These rich, but rarely studied, satirical articles will be the subject of my presentation, which will focus on the author’s reflection on the development of Spain as a modern nation and its relationship to the American colonies in the aftermath of the celebrations of the four hundredth anniversary of Columbus’ arrival in the Americas.

Sponsored by: Dean of the College
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu
  Wednesday, January 30, 2013
Mesa de Espanol
Kline, President's Room  12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Come and share your Spanish while you have lunch.
Wednesdays

Sponsored by: Spanish Studies
Contact: Melanie Nicholson  845-758-7382  nicholso@bard.edu